11 February 2006

Ghost Dog Reviews: More Great Local Brews

Not long ago, I reviewed the Main Street Ale House in Gresham. Pretty nice place, and basically the only brewpub in Gresham. We'd been back once before tonight, and we're infatuated with the Pepper Brandy Steak.

Anyway, tonight we invited our pals Ryan & Kelly out to join us there. We have the best time whenever we go out with them, and we figured the Main Street Ale House would be a good excuse to get them to come to our part of town for a change. :) Usually, we go to a brewpub or ale house closer to downtown Portland when we go out with them,
so I was pleased to be able to 'show off' a place that was closer to us that had some really good microbrews that were made on-premises. They seemed to like the place, so hopefully we'll do a few more trips from time to time.

Anyway, the first time we went, I'd tried their amber - which I enjoyed - so I knew I had a fall-back brew in case I didn't find a seasonal I liked. Last time out, I had their interpretation of the Poor Richard's Ale - which I really enjoyed - so I knew what I wanted if it was still available. When we arrived, I found they had the Poor Richard's Ale, as well as a couple other brews that sounded right up my alley.

Poor Richard's Ale has been brewed all over the country this January by various micro/craft breweries to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Ben Franklin's birth. More info can be found here. I didn't review it on my blog after I first had some, but I will here. It tasted like a strong brown ale, kind of old-world-ish, and you can make out the molasses somewhat. Reminded me quite a bit of Wolaver's Certified Organic Brown Ale, which is one of my very favorite ales. I would like to go try some other brewers' versions, but I have no idea if the other nearby pubs (Laurelwood and the Rock Bottom) still have it on tap. The Main Street Ale House's version was excellent.

The other one I tried a taster of, and eventually shared a pitcher of with Ryan, was their "80 Shilling" scottish ale. This was a malty, fairly strong, and smooth scotch ale with a nice brown color and medium body. It was like a porter, but not as bitter, and just a tad more full-bodied. I really liked it, as did Ryan, who bought himself a growler of the stuff. (We picked up the tab for dinner, so Ryan bought me a growler of the 80 Shilling as well, which was mighty nice - if unnecessary - of him.) Good stuff.

I also had a taster of their "American Dunkel Weissbier" (what is it with me and dark beers, anyhow?), which was nowhere near as 'wheaty' as any Weizen I've ever had, but it was very smooth but a bit more hoppy (but not much) than the other two beers. Usually, the wife doesn't like dark beers, but she said she liked this one. So did I.

7 comments:

Ryan said...

Funny, I too posted about this evening including the Main Street Ale House. :) Ended up stopping somewhere else on the way home...

-r-

Ghost Dog said...

Beck pointed that out to me last night. Is Moon & Sixpence where you guys want to do St. Patty's?

Ryan said...

We could try the Moon & Sixpence for St. Patrick's, though their food menu was fairly limited compared to the Rose & Thistle. They're both good options though, and will hopefully be less cramed with people than any spot downtown.

tabitha jane said...

have you been the horse brass?

my word verification was bfugok!

Ghost Dog said...

TJ: Yup, been there several times. Cool place, and Belmont Station is a great place to get obscure brews.

Breanna said...

I'm trying to remember if you've reviewed Widmer Brothers Brewery and restaurant...i was so excited to go this past friday night...turns out the beer was HORRIBLE and i wasn't the only one who thought so! the hef was the only bearable drink in the place. strange...i had such high expectations. thoughts?

Ghost Dog said...

Breanna - I haven't ever been to the Widmer place, so no review. I've only ever had 3 of their beers - the Widberry, the Hef, and their Drop Top Amber (my favorite of the bunch, and IMO the best local amber ale).